Vet Hospital Services


Pets are Family * Hours * M-S 8a-8p Sun 10a-4p T closed Appointments start at 9 am


Veterinary Hospital

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Open several days a Week



Ph: 714-847-2519

     714-847-2510

 

Hours * please call

Appointments recommended,  start at 9 am every business day but Sunday at 10 am

Veterinary Clinic Location

Dr. Sean Alley

DVM/Veterinarian


 




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http://www.beachgarfieldvet.com/

 

Beach-Garfield Veterinary Hospital

18861 Beach Blvd

Huntington Beach, CA 92648

Ph: (714) 847 - 2519

 

Open several days a Week

Ph: 714-847-2519

     714-847-2510

  • Monday :            8 am -   8 pm
  • Tuesday :              closed       
  • Wednesday:         8 am -   8 pm
  • Thursday:             8 am -   8 pm
  • Friday:                  8 am -   8 pm
  • Saturday:             8 am -    8 pm
  • Sunday:              10 am -   4  pm

Appointments start at 9 am everyday, appointments are recommended but we do take walk in's .

Home & Hospital Vet Services

    • Rabies vaccinations
  • Surgery
  • Xray and Ultrasound
  • Dental Cleaning
  • Low cost surgery
  • cat and dog Vaccinations
  • Health Certificates international/interstate
  • Microchipping
  • Comprehensive Physical Exams
  • Heart exam 
  • Echo
  • Ultrasound
  • Digital X Rays
  • Second Opinions
  • At home dog and cat exam and vaccinations
  • At Home Humane Pet Euthanasia for terminal and hopless cases
  • Fecal test and Deworming
  • Heartworm test, Treatments and preventative
  • Advanced Flea Control that works
  • Blood Chemistries & Hematology
  • Urinalysis
  • Minor and Major Surgeries
  • Allergy Testing
  • Skin Biopsy for Skin Diseases
  • Ear Exams
  • Cat Boarding
  • Parvo test and treatments
  • Feline Leukemia test FELV/FIV
  • Routine and Preventive Healthcare
  • Pet's Palliative Care and Pain Control

If your pet need more treatment than what can be done at home, Dr Sean Alley will recommend to bring your pet to Beach-Garfield Veterinary Hospital. 

At Beach-Garfield Veterinary Hospital your pet will be able to get more care than at home.

Animal/Pet Hospital Hours

Open several Days a week.

We Also take Emergency calls

Open several days a Week

Ph: 714-847-2519

     714-847-2510

Hours * Mon-Sat 8a-8p

Sun 10a-4p

Appointments start at 10 am

 

Monday to Saturday 8 am to 8 pm

Tues closed

Sunday:                 10 am to 4 pm

Please call   714-  847 - 2519

Dr. Appointments start at 9 am. most days.

 

Emergency call.

(714) 847-2519

Contact Us

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Payments Accepted

vet house calls payment options

sorry we do not accept checks

Grieving A Pet

grieving a pet

Letting go of your best friend is never easy, regardless of how they leave this world. Many of our pets spend their entire lives with us, and even those who don’t have formed unbreakable bonds of love with us, due to their important place in our lives. Dr. Alley recognizes that grieving a pet can be incredibly difficult, even well after your family member has passed on.

 

The loss of a pet will cause a great deal of pain and distress, which can manifest in a variety of emotions and behaviors. Experiencing the 5 stages of grief—anger, depression, bargaining, denial, and acceptance—are completely normal. Depending on the individual, the process of working through grief can seem relatively short, or impossibly long. While most people will experience all of these emotions, some will feel just a few; this is normal too.

 

Grieving a Pet

 

Grieving a pet is a process unique to everyone, but we can help insure that you aren’t alone. We’ve provided links, below, with helpful information that may assist you in dealing with pet loss and grieving a pet. And don’t be ashamed to reach out to others for help. If your feelings become too overwhelming, talk to a friend, family member, or neighbor about your loss, or consult a professional therapist to help you through this difficult process.

 

 

American Veterinary Medical Association
http://www.avma.org/careforanimals/...

 

American Animal Hospital Association
http://www.healthypet.com/...

 

Association for Pet Loss and Bereavement
http://www.aplb.org

 

Pet Loss Grief Website
http://www.petloss.com

 

Pet Loss Website
http://www.pet-loss.net

 

UC - Davis Pet Loss Hotline
http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/ccab/petloss.html

 

Cornell University Pet Loss Hotline
http://web.vet.cornell.edu/Org/PetLoss

 

Michigan State University Pet Loss Hotline
http://cvm.msu.edu/petloss/

 


 

Coping with Pet Loss

by Moira Anderson Allen, M.Ed.

 

Anyone who considers a pet a beloved friend, companion, or family member knows the intense pain that accompanies the loss of that friend. Following are some tips on coping with that grief, and with the difficult decisions one faces upon the loss of a pet.

 

Am I crazy to hurt so much?

 

Intense grief over the loss of a pet is normal and natural. Don't let anyone tell you that it's silly, crazy, or overly sentimental to grieve.

 

During the years you spent with your pet (even if they were few), it became a significant and constant part of your life. It was a source of comfort and companionship, of unconditional love and acceptance, of fun and joy. So don't be surprised if you feel devastated by the loss of such a relationship.

 

People who don't understand the pet/owner bond may not understand your pain. All that matters, however, is how you feel. Don't let others dictate your feelings: They are valid, and may be extremely painful. But remember, you are not alone: Thousands of pet owners have gone through the same feelings.

 

What Can I Expect to Feel?

 

Different people experience grief in different ways. Besides your sorrow and loss, you may also experience the following emotions:

 

Guilt may occur if you feel responsible for your pet's death-the "if only I had been more careful" syndrome. It is pointless and often erroneous to burden yourself with guilt for the accident or illness that claimed your pet's life, and only makes it more difficult to resolve your grief.

 

Denial makes it difficult to accept that your pet is really gone. It's hard to imagine that your pet won't greet you when you come home, or that it doesn't need its evening meal. Some pet owners carry this to extremes, and fear their pet is still alive and suffering somewhere. Others find it hard to get a new pet for fear of being "disloyal" to the old.

 

Anger may be directed at the illness that killed your pet, the driver of the speeding car, the veterinarian who "failed" to save its life. Sometimes it is justified, but when carried to extremes, it distracts you from the important task of resolving your grief.

Depression is a natural consequence of grief, but can leave you powerless to cope with your feelings. Extreme depression robs you of motivation and energy, causing you to dwell upon your sorrow.

 

What can I do about my feelings?

 

The most important step you can take is to be honest about your feelings. Don't deny your pain, or your feelings of anger and guilt. Only by examining and coming to terms with your feelings can you begin to work through them.

You have a right to feel pain and grief. Someone you loved has died, and you feel alone and bereaved. You have a right to feel anger and guilt, as well. Acknowledge your feelings first, then ask yourself whether the circumstances actually justify them.

 

Locking away grief doesn't make it go away. Express it. Cry, scream, pound the floor, talk it out. Do what helps you the most. Don't try to avoid grief by not thinking about your pet; instead, reminisce about the good times. This will help you understand what your pet's loss actually means to you.

 

Some find it helpful to express their feelings and memories in poems, stories, or letters to the pet. Other strategies including rearranging your schedule to fill in the times you would have spent with your pet; preparing a memorial such as a photo collage; and talking to others about your loss.

 

Who can I talk to?

 

If your family or friends love pets, they'll understand what you're going through. Don't hide your feelings in a misguided effort to appear strong and calm. Working through your feelings with another person is one of the best ways to put them in perspective and find ways to handle them. Find someone you can talk to about how much the pet meant to you and how much you miss it-someone you feel comfortable crying and grieving with.

 

If you don't have family or friends who understand, or if you need more help, ask your veterinarian or humane association to recommend a pet loss counselor or support group. Check with your church or hospital for grief counseling. Remember, your grief is genuine and deserving of support.

 

When is the right time to euthanize (put to sleep) a pet?

 

Your family and your veterinarian are the best judge of your pet's physical condition; however, you are the best judge of the quality of your pet's daily life. If a pet has a good appetite, responds to attention, seeks its owner's company, and participates in play or family life, many owners feel that this is not the time. However, if a pet is in constant pain, undergoing difficult and stressful treatments that aren't helping greatly, unresponsive to affection, unaware of its surroundings, and uninterested in life, a caring pet owner will probably choose to end the beloved companion's suffering.

 

Evaluate your pet's health honestly and unselfishly with your veterinarian. Prolonging a pet's suffering in order to prevent your own ultimately helps neither of you. Nothing can make this decision an easy or painless one, but it is truly the final act of love that you can make for your pet.

 

What should I tell my children?

 

You are the best judge of how much information your children can handle about death and the loss of their pet. Don't underestimate them, however. You may find that, by being honest with them about your pet's loss, you may be able to address some fears and misperceptions they have about death.

 

Honesty is important. If you say the pet was "put to sleep," make sure your children understand the difference between death and ordinary sleep. Never say the pet "went away," or your child may wonder what he or she did to make it leave, and wait in anguish for its return. That also makes it harder for a child to accept a new pet. Make it clear that the pet will not come back, but that it is happy and free of pain.

 

Never assume a child is too young or too old to grieve. Never criticize a child for tears, or tell them to "be strong" or not to feel sad. Be honest about your own sorrow; don't try to hide it, or children may feel required to hide their grief as well. Discuss the issue with the entire family, and give everyone a chance to work through their grief at their own pace.

 

Will my other pets grieve?

 

Pets observe every change in a household, and are bound to notice the absence of a companion. Pets often form strong attachments to one another, and the survivor of such a pair may seem to grieve for its companion. Cats grieve for dogs, and dogs for cats.

 

You may need to give your surviving pets a lot of extra attention and love to help them through this period. Remember that, if you are going to introduce a new pet, your surviving pets may not accept the newcomer right away, but new bonds will grow in time. Meanwhile, the love of your surviving pets can be wonderfully healing for your own grief.

 

Should I get a new pet right away?

 

Generally, the answer is no. One needs time to work through grief and loss before attempting to build a relationship with a new pet. If your emotions are still in turmoil, you may resent a new pet for trying to "take the place" of the old-for what you really want is your old pet back. Children in particular may feel that loving a new pet is "disloyal" to the previous pet.

When you do get a new pet, avoid getting a "lookalike" pet, which makes comparisons all the more likely. Don't expect your new pet to be "just like" the one you lost, but allow it to develop its own personality. Never give a new pet the same name or nickname as the old. Avoid the temptation to compare the new pet to the old one: It can be hard to remember that your beloved companion also caused a few problems when it was young.

 

A new pet should be acquired because you are ready to move forward and build a new relationship-rather than looking backward and mourning your loss. When you are ready, select an animal with whom you can build another long, loving relationship-because this is what having a pet is all about.

 

Dr. Sean Alley is available for house calls in Orange County, CA and Southern Los Angeles County. Pet veterinary services are available in Irvine, Newport Beach, Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Long Beach, Bellflower, Tustin, Orange, Lake Forest, Mission Viejo, Aliso Viejo, Laguna Beach, Laguna Niguel, Santa Ana, Westminster, Garden Grove, Fullerton, Anaheim, Fountain Valley, Coto De Caza, Lakewood, Seal Beach, Santa Monica, Torrance, Redondo Beach. Veterinary home service is also available in other nearby cities. Please call Dr. Alley for availability.